However, according to a new Entrepreneurship Policy Digest released last week by the Kauffman Foundation that summarizes several current immigration policy ideas, it remains difficult for immigrants to bring their entrepreneurial ideas to reality in America." /> Policy Innovations to Promote Immigrant Entrepreneurship | Kauffman.org

Policy Innovations to Promote Immigrant Entrepreneurship

High-skilled immigrant entreprenuers 

The issue of immigration reform continues to simmer as policymakers look for common ground on discussions such as improvements to the existing visa system and enhanced border security. Recently, a Wall Street Journal article referenced a report that showed an increase in the number of immigrant entrepreneurs running "Main Street businesses."

However, according to a new Entrepreneurship Policy Digest released last week by the Kauffman Foundation that summarizes several current immigration policy ideas, it remains difficult for immigrants to bring their entrepreneurial ideas to reality in America.

Legal barriers to immigrant entrepreneurship result in lost jobs, lost innovation and lost growth in the United States.

Immigrant Entrepreneurs: A Path to U.S. Economic Growth looks at policy ideas at the federal, state and local levels for how to capture the economic benefits and growth that come from entrepreneurial immigrants, including:

Federal:

  • Creation of a startup visa that allows immigrants to start companies in the United States, and which Kauffman analysis shows could create up to 1.6 million new American jobs.
  • Expansion of visa programs to allow foreign students studying entrepreneurship and other fields to start businesses in the United States during the length of their visa as well as pursue permanent residency.
  • Modification of existing visas so that more immigrants can pursue entrepreneurship in the United States.

State:

  • Creation of university-affiliated programs that allow immigrant entrepreneurs to contribute to state economic development.
  • Creation of state-based work visas giving states a say in how visas are allotted, allowing states to match the needs of their regional economy with skilled workers.
  • Development of clear processes for evaluating training, skills and education of immigrants earned abroad.

Local:

  • Creation of initiatives to train, connect and assist immigrant entrepreneurs.

 

[Photo credit: Michael Alvarez-Pereyre for Gvahim]

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mark marich

Mark Marich

Mark Marich is the executive vice president of Global Entrepreneurship Week. Since 1998, Marich has provided communications leadership on several national initiatives and more than 100 public forums covering a wide range of policy issues, including: entrepreneurial growth & economic development; health care; renewable energy; telecommunications; regulatory reform; and, workforce development.