Kauffman Foundation Honors Promising Scholars for Ground-Breaking Research in Entrepreneurship

Kauffman Emerging Scholars Awards Inspire Young Researchers to Study Entrepreneurship

(KANSAS CITY, Mo.) Jan. 5, 2015 – The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation announced today the recipient of the 2015 Ewing Marion Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research and the recipients of the 2015 Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship. The awards were presented Sunday, Jan. 4, at the Allied Social Science Associations' annual meeting in Boston, Mass.

"We are proud to honor these bright emerging scholars for their outstanding work in academic entrepreneurship study," said Robert J. Strom, PhD, director of research and policy at the Foundation. "Not only is their work significant, but they represent some of the brightest future leaders in the field of entrepreneurship research who will influence our next generation of academics."

The Kauffman Foundation funds a series of programs and initiatives designed to create a substantial body of research on entrepreneurship. The Foundation's Emerging Scholars programs assist promising scholars in their efforts to earn doctoral degrees, encourage scholars to conduct research early in their careers and recognize ground-breaking research—all with a focus on entrepreneurship. These programs support and recognize achievements at each career level of an academic professional. Following are the recipients of this year's awards:

Ewing Marion Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research in Entrepreneurship
As a tribute to Ewing Marion Kauffman and his entrepreneurial work, the Kauffman Foundation established the Ewing Marion Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research in Entrepreneurship in 2005 to inspire young scholars to contribute new insight into the field of entrepreneurship. The Medal, which includes a $50,000 prize, is awarded annually to recognize scholars under the age of 40 whose research has made a significant contribution to entrepreneurship. More information on the Kauffman Prize Medal can be found at www.kauffman.org/kauffmanprize.

Ramana Nanda is an associate professor of Business Administration in Entrepreneurial Management at Harvard Business School. His research focuses on understanding financing constraints for startups and the ways in which the structure of the financial sector impacts innovation and entrepreneurship in the economy. One strand of research has looked at debt financing for small businesses. This work has examined how the availability and the cost of personal debt, as well as how the structure of the commercial banking sector, has shaped the entry and growth of small businesses. A second strand examines the financing of innovation and the commercialization of new technologies. This work has focused on how constraints to experimentation by venture capital and angel investors across industries, regions or time impact the rate and trajectory of innovation by startup ventures.

Nanda is a faculty research fellow in the Productivity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program at the NBER, and a faculty affiliate at the SME Initiative of Innovations for Poverty Action. At Harvard University, he is a faculty affiliate of both the Center for International Development and the Center for the Environment. He received his PhD from MIT's Sloan School of Management and has a BA and MA in economics from Trinity College, Cambridge, U.K. He is a recipient of the 2010 Kauffman Junior Faculty Fellowship in Entrepreneurship Research and a 2006 Kauffman Dissertation Fellow.

Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program
The Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program annually recognizes 15 exceptional doctoral students and their universities. Fifteen fellowships in the amount of $15,000 each will be awarded to the students to support their dissertation research in the area of entrepreneurship. Including the current class of fellows, 168 awards have been made since the program was created in 2003. More information on the Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program can be found at www.kauffman.org/kdfp.

The 2015 fellowship recipients, along with their university affiliations and the titles of their dissertations, are:

Sebastian Dyrda, University of Minnesota
Business Cycles, Firm Dynamics and Frictional Financial Markets

Daniel Fehder, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Seed Accelerators, Startups and Ecosystems: Mechanisms and Regional Impacts

Daniel Garcia-Macia, Stanford University
The Financing of Ideas and The Great Deviation

Julia Garlick, Yale University
Occupational and Educational Choice in a Changing Financial Environment

Michela Giorcelli, Stanford University
The Effects of Management and Technology on Productivity: Lessons from the US Marshall Plan in Italy

Lucy Yi Hu, University of California, Berkeley
What is the Crowd Worth? The Role of Peer Effects in Crowdfunding

Yujin Kim, University of California, Berkeley
Market Creation and Dynamic Commercialization Strategies of Entrepreneurs: New Evidence from the Orphan Drug Act

Sara Moreira, University of Chicago
Are Businesses Born in Recessions Different? Life-Cycle Consequences of Economic Conditions at Inception

Christian Moser, Princeton University
Essays on Entrepreneurship and Inequality

Abhishek Nagaraj, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Mapping Innovation: Essays on the Geography of GPS-Based Entrepreneurship

Megha Patnaik, Stanford University
Entrepreneurship & the Great Recession

Briana Sell, Georgia Institute of Technology
Essays on Human Capital and Entrepreneurship

Yufei Wu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Does A Bigger Market Size Facilitate Transactions in Markets for Technology? Impact on Licensing Strategy and Matching Quality in Pharmaceutical Licensing

Sandy Yu, New York University
The Impact of Accelerators on High-Technology Ventures

Oren Ziv, Harvard University
Essays in Entrepreneurial Productivity, Location Decisions, and Urban Density