On Forbes: Casting the Spotlight on Successful Women Entrepreneurs

"Branding the startup community as a homogeneous group of rich, white men is not just offensive, it's factually wrong, and it's not going to attract the diversity needed to build a robust entrepreneurship pipeline."

That's according to Alicia Robb, Kauffman Foundation senior fellow, in this blog post for Forbes.com.

In the post, Alicia features recent success stories in Boulder, Colorado, and highlights promising programs that seek to close the large, persistent gender gap in venture capital funding.

Read an excerpt of the post below.

Boulder, Colorado: The World Leader in Women's Entrepreneurship?

The media need to do a better job highlighting successful programs that are helping to move the needle in the number of equity-backed ventures led by women and successful entrepreneurs who are women.


Case in point, there was a great opinion piece in the local Boulder newspaper in response to comments made at a city council meeting in Boulder. Councilman Macon Cowles said Boulder's startup economy was attracting "highly paid white men to the city, and they were pricing out families and others."


He then followed up with the statement "I don't think that's what people want."


These kinds of statements are unacceptable.


Branding the startup community as a homogeneous group of rich, white men is not just offensive, it's factually wrong, and it's not going to attract the diversity needed to build a robust entrepreneurship pipeline.


Yet, until we see more covers of Time magazine and the New York Times promoting women entrepreneurs, the public perception is going to remain fixed on men as the premier entrepreneurial role models.

Read the rest of the post on Forbes.com